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Founding Nutrition

A Nutritional Pioneer

Dr. Lee’s zeal for nutritional supplements was a very new concept in the 1920s. He worked tirelessly to educate people about the importance of whole foods in relation to overall health. At that time, the value of nutrition wasn’t as scientifically clear as it is today, and Dr. Lee had his work cut out for him. He continued to research and develop nutritional supplements based on his philosophy that, “Good health comes from good nutrition, and the best nutrients come from whole foods.”

Dr. Lee created new techniques to prepare vitamin and mineral concentrates that retained the vital factors found in food. Many unique formulas followed. As time went on there was more acceptance of nutritional supplementation and many of Dr. Lee's ideas became widely accepted. Today, we can recognize his legacy and the importance of nutrition and holistic engineering. Dr. Lee is viewed as a trailblazer in the nutrition movement and his company, Standard Process, Inc., continues his mission to provide whole food nutrient solutions.

Promoting Nutrition

Whole Food NutritionIn 1941, Dr. Lee organized the Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research. The goal of the foundation was to address nutritional challenges and educate people about the importance of proper nutrition. Under the auspices of the foundation, Dr. Lee published countless works of research on the topic of whole food nutrition and its positive effect on health and wellbeing.

Dr. Lee felt that there is an enormous benefit to eating whole, unprocessed foods. Dr. Lee’s systems thinking approach to biologic networks asserted that a vitamin is not a single compound, but a group of interdependent compounds. He also stated that these compounds form a “nutrient complex” so intricate that only a living cell can create it. The Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research published several writings focusing on the beneficial nutrient complexes in butter, brown rice, oats, barley, rye, barley, corn, bread potatoes, sauerkraut and flour.

Referring to the highly processed, bleached flour of the day as “foodless calories”, Dr. Lee considered wheat flour almost as perishable as milk. He said, ”the vitamin of flour is lost as soon as the flour’s oils becomes rancid—a change that occurs in a few days after the milling of the grain, unless the flour is refrigerated.”

As a leading critic of commercially produced flour; Dr. Lee developed his home flour mill as a way for average Americans to derive the optimal nutritional benefit in whole wheat flour. The current Household Flour mill is the direct descendant of that original mill, with some modern improvements.